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Showing posts from February, 2017

6 steps to saving on your cell phone plan

When it comes to choosing a cell phone plan, the choices just got a lot more interesting. In just the past week all four carriers have all revamped their plans with a focus on unlimited data.
But just because unlimited is hot now doesn't mean it's right for you. Here's how you can make the most of your cell phone plan.

The next iPhone could have a bigger display and more battery

While the iPhone 8 isn’t going to be announced until September, this week has been packed with rumors on the upcoming device. And it looks like the display is going to be the main star of the show.
Rumor has it that Apple is going to announce three new devices — two new versions of the iPhone 7 and the iPhone 7 Plus, and a new high-end device that could cost more than $1,000. And it looks like the rumors around the display are for this mysterious “iPhone Pro” model.


Arrest of Samsung’s Lee may not affect smartphone business in short term

The arrest of Samsung Electronics’ vice chairman Lee Jae-yong on Friday in South Korea may not have a direct impact on the company’s high-profile electronics business, including its smartphones unit, according to analysts.
Samsung announced in 2012 the promotion of the executive, also known as Jay. Y. Lee, to his current formal position at Samsung Electronics. But he is largely seen as the de-facto leader of the Samsung Group, running the business on behalf of his ailing father, Samsung Chairman Lee Kun-Hee.
He was arrested on charges of bribery as part of an alleged corruption scandal that led to the impeachment of South Korea’s President Park Geun-hye.

Wireless power transmission safely charges devices anywhere within a room

A new method developed by Disney Research for wirelessly transmitting power throughout a room enables users to charge electronic devices as seamlessly as they now connect to WiFi hotspots, eliminating the need for electrical cords or charging cradles.


The researchers demonstrated their method, called quasistatic cavity resonance (QSCR), inside a specially built 16-by-16-foot room at their lab. They safely generated near-field standing magnetic waves that filled the interior of the room, making it possible to power several cellphones, fans and lights simultaneously.



Google wants to use Chrome to suck you into virtual reality

Google says it's now time to marry two computing realms: the web and virtual reality.
Its latest version of the Chrome browser includes a technology called WebVR, which lets programmers create websites that present the computer-generated 3D worlds of virtual reality. If you're into VR, you might appreciate the promise WebVR holds for expanding what you can do with a device like a Google Daydream View or a Facebook Oculus Rift VR headset.

That's because, in principle at least, WebVR makes it easier for developers to create a single VR experience that'll work across many VR headsets instead of having to create a separate version for each device. It's an extension of how a single website can span your laptop, Android phone or iPad tablet.


Google Play listing shows how you'll pay on Android Wear

Google is hoping the release of Android Wear 2.0 will push more people toward smartwatches, and one of the key pillars of that strategy is Android Pay. 
Ahead of the launch, it has (perhaps accidentally) released some screenshots on the Play Store that show how it'll work and look. At supported retailers with an Android Pay or contactless logo, you simply hold your NFC-equipped Android Wear watch next to the terminal until it's approved. It'll then detail the latest transaction in a list, and you can scroll to see your recent history.

In other words, you'll get the ability to pay like a boss from your wrist instead of digging around for your phone, a feature Apple Watch and Samsung Gear S3 Watch users have had for a while now. However, there's a catch -- your smartwatch must have an NFC chip, and no current models do, so current owners are out of luck. Thanks to a leak, however, we know that LG and Google are set to release two models, the LG Watch Spor…

Lenovo's latest Android tablet is really a budget laptop

The Yoga A12 could be better than an entry-level PC in the right circumstances.


The tablet market is increasingly skewing toward laptop replacements, but what if you want a replacement for a low-cost laptop? Lenovo thinks it has the answer. It's introducing the Yoga A12, a 12.2-inch tablet that's really a budget convertible laptop for the Android crowd. 

Think of it as a lower-priced but larger alternative to the Yoga Book. You won't find the earlier model's pen input or Windows 10 option, but you'll still get a very portable design (it's 0.21 inches thick at its slimmest point) that can fold into a slate when you're watching Netflix, or a laptop when you need to get work done. The trick, as with the Yoga Book, is a flat touch-sensitive keyboard that eliminates some of the usual physical bulk. We found the Book's keyboard hard to get used to, but it might be easier on the A12's larger, more comfortable surface

The A12 still has an Atom x5 chip powering…

iOS cracking tools reportedly used by FBI released to public

Last year, the FBI ordered Apple to help crack the iPhone 5c owned by Syed Farook, one of the shooters in the 2015 attacks in San Bernardino. Apple refused, and the FBI reportedly worked with Cellebrite, an Israeli firm that specializes in mobile security. According to a statement from Celelbrite last month, a hacker breached one of its legacy servers. Now the hacker has released some of that data as a warning to the FBI. The data released includes code that seems to relate to Cellebrite's Universal Forensic Extraction Device (UFED), and can allegedly crack older iPhones like the 5c as well as Android and Blackberry devices. Speaking anonymously to Motherboardthe hacker explained that simply creating these tools makes their release inevitable, where they can be used by anyone with technical knowledge, including oppressive regimes around the world. "It's important to demonstrate that when you create these tools, they will make it out. History should make that clear,"…